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Faculty Support


Professorships

Establish a named professorship or contribute to a developing or existing endowment.  Named professorial chairs help Cornell Law School recruit and retain the finest teacher/scholars in legal academia.

Sesquicentennial Faculty Fellowships

Support the initiative for faculty replacement and renewal in honor of the 150th anniversary of the founding of Cornell University.

Graduate Research Assistantships

Underwrite the work-study stipends of J.D. candidates who assist faculty research.

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Professorships

A named professorial chair is the greatest distinction an educational institution can confer on a member of its faculty.  Such a position is established and permanent, and its incumbent is distinguished by a title that carries the name of the donor or the name of the person or persons the donor has chosen to honor.  It is important that Cornell Law School have professorships available in as many subject areas as possible, for faculty members who are highly-accomplished as both teachers and scholars regard these appointments as the ultimate affirmation of a lifetime's commitment.  In order to recruit young faculty with the potential to attain this level of excellence, and to retain mid-career and senior faculty who continue to demonstrate it, Cornell Law School must be able to offer compensation and benefits that are commensurate with the professional standard.

Twenty named professorships have been created in Cornell Law School.  Given the magnitude of the commitment, these endowments are generally established by a single, highly-motivated donor with significant financial resources.  We invite alumni and friends who are interested in philanthropy on this scale to review the catalogue of existing professorships.

Existing Professorships

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Sesquicentennial Faculty Fellowships

To mark the 150th anniversary in 2015 of the founding of Cornell University, colleges and schools campus-wide are encouraging the creation of Sesquicentennial Faculty Fellowships.  These positions are intended to spur Cornell's faculty-recruitment effort, which aims to offset the impending retirement of many tenured faculty members with the hiring of young and mid-career academics set solidly on the tenure-track.  Cornell Law School seeks to establish two Sesquicentennial Faculty Fellowships at $500,000 each.  A gift at this level will be matched by the University, thereby creating a $1,000,000 fund that will be spent as current-use money.  The subject areas of the prospective Fellowships are expected to be in business law and constitutional law, respectively.  If suitable candidates in these areas are not available, the Law School will hire Fellows in contract law and civil procedure.

Naming Thresholds

Graduate Research Assistantships

To support its faculty in their scholarly work, Cornell Law School spends more than $100,000 each year on student research assistants.  As the term indicates, student research assistants are law students who help faculty members accomplish scholarly research.  These students might identify and compile sources, screen articles and books for content relevant to the instant project, monitor copyright and "fair use" stipulations, proofread text, inquire about publication, and provide other services essential to the timely production of publishable research.  They are paid a stipend based on an hourly rate; the rate is not high, but the number of hours worked can be.

At present, the Law School pays the cost of graduate research assistantships from current-use funds.  A devoted endowment would remove this expenditure, in whole or in part, from the annual budget.  A gift at the $100,000 level would be sufficient to name the fund and would yield about $4,200 annually.  An endowment of $1,000,000 would generate, each year, more than one-third of the annual cost of this program.

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