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Alternative Careers

Every year there are students who come to law school unsure of whether they want to practice law or use their legal training for other professional opportunities. Some are interested in combining other skills or degrees with their legal background. A law degree can serve you well when you are looking at jobs outside of the traditional legal profession. Your background will indicate to prospective employers the ability to think logically, write clearly, manage complex issues, and anticipate problems.

If you’re thinking about an alternative career using your law training, there are several excellent books in the Career Library to help you begin to think about your options, including:

  • What Can You Do With a Law Degree? by Deborah Arron
  • JD Preferred: 500+ Things You Can Do With a Law Degree (Other Than Practice Law), published by Federal Reports, Inc.

If you are considering a non-traditional career path, please make an appointment with a career counselor to assist you in planning an effective job-search strategy. Some general suggestions for pursuing these kinds of opportunities include adapting your resume to highlight skills not directly related to law and explaining your choice to pursue a particular non-law option in your cover letter. Also, even if you think that you'll never practice law in a traditional sense, the Career Services Office recommends that you take the bar examination when you graduate, since it provides one more useful credential.