REVISION: The Public Use Requirement and the Character of Consequentialist Reasoning

By Gregory S. Alexander

How does expropriation fit into a human flourishing theory of property? If we take it that property owners owe members of their communities obligations to provide resources necessary to develop those capabilities that are essential to human flourishing, then what does this require of them in terms of the state’s power to expropriate?

Gregory S. Alexander A. Robert Noll Professor of Law
Photo of Gregory Alexander

Contact Information

Cornell Law School
202 Myron Taylor Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853-4901

Phone: (607) 255-3504
Fax: (607) 255-7193


Ernestine Da Silva
Cornell Law School
315 Myron Taylor Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853-4901

Professional Biography

Professor Gregory S. Alexander, an internationally renowned expert in property law and theory, has taught at Cornell Law School since 1985.

Following his graduation from Northwestern University School of Law, he clerked on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. After a year as a Bigelow Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, Alexander became a professor at the University of Georgia School of Law, where he remained until coming to Cornell. Professor Alexander has been a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Science, in Palo Alto, California and at the Max-Planck-Institutes for Comparative Law, in Hamburg and Heidelberg, Germany. He has taught at UCLA, Virginia, and Harvard Law Schools, and was the Herbert Smith Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Cambridge University.

Professor Alexander is a prolific and recognized writer, the winner of the American Publishers Association's 1997 Best Book of the Year in Law award for his work, Commodity and Propriety. His other books include The Global Debate Over Constitutional Property: Lessons for American Takings Jurisprudence (Chicago), Community & Property (with Eduardo Peñalver) (Oxford), and Properties of Property (with Hanoch Dagan) (Aspen). His most recent book is An Introduction to Property Theory (with Eduardo Peñalver) (Cambridge).


B.A., University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 1970
J.D., Northwestern University School of Law, 1973