Liberian-American History

One of the goals of this website is to add valuable primary and other historical resources, and that process is underway, with the scanning of early Liberian/Colonialization Society laws, and the scanning of early books on Liberia.  These should be used, however, in combination with other valuable resources at other websites.

Also mounted at Cornell is the Samuel May Collection of Anti-Slavery Pamphlets (http://dlxs.library.cornell.edu/m/mayantislavery/), many of which discuss Liberia.

A major contribution has been and continues to be made by Indiana University's Liberia Collections Project (http://onliberia.org/)  In addition to the valuable information already available at the site, it has committed to archive all available Liberian government documents, and has possession of the collections of two great Liberianists, Svend E. Holsoe and Warren L. d'Asevedo.  Contributions to achieve these critically important goals are accepted the website.

The Data and Program Library Service of the University Wisconsin has mounted the Liberian Roll of Emigrants from 1820-1843, and the Liberian Census of 1843 (http://www.disc.wisc.edu/Liberia/). The March 2000 Indiana Historian is devoted to the residents of Indiana who immigrated to Liberia (http://www.statelib.lib.in.us/www/ihb/publications/inemigrants.pdf). 

The Library of Congress has provided a wealth of online resources for researchers. Within the "African-American Mosaic" section of the site (http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african/afam001.html), the history of colonization of Liberia (http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african/afam002.html), complete with images of historical documents and personal stories, serves to bring this period alive for the modern reader. There is also a Liberian Map Collection, an African-American pamphlet collection which includes many references to Liberia (http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aapchtml/aapchome.html), and a lawmaking section which provides many documents on Congress's views and role in the colonization effort (http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/amlaw/lawhome.html).

Three letter collections, from the University of Virginia (http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/subjects/liberia/), the Loudoun Museum (http://www.loudounmuseum.org/letters.html), and from the University of Kentucky (http://www.bluegrass.kctcs.edu/LCC/HIS/scraps/liberia.html) provide (often heartbreaking) first person accounts of the immigrants to Liberia from the U.S.

Finally, the University of North Carolina's Documenting the American South Collection (http://docsouth.unc.edu/index.html) includes several full-text resources, including complete books, on Liberia.