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2012 Empirical Health Law Conference short
Cornell Law Hosts Third Annual Empirical
Health Law Conference
Ithaca, NEW YORK, May 18, 2012

On April 27, a diverse group of scholars in law, economics, and policy convened for the third annual Empirical Health Law Conference, held for the first time at Cornell Law School. The conference was co-sponsored by the Law School’s Law and Economics Program and Georgetown’s O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, whose Kathryn Zeiler co-organized the event with Cornell Law Professor Michael Frakes.

William White, Professor of Policy Analysis and Management (PAM) and the Sloan Program in Health Administration (SLOAN), Cornell University Stewart J. Schwab, the Allan R. Tessler Dean and Professor of Law, Cornell Law School Kathryn Zeiler, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center Michael Frakes, Professor of Law, Cornell Law School William White, Professor of Policy Analysis and Management (PAM) and the Sloan Program in Health Administration (SLOAN), Cornell University Samuel Kleiner, Assistant Professor of Policy Analysis and Management, Cornell University


Linda and Timothy O’Neill [whose philanthropy established the Institute] are excited about empirical health law research, because they view it as a way for the academy to have a voice in the policymaking realm.” said Zeiler in her opening remarks. “All the projects on today's agenda should be part of current legal reform debates.”

The conference’s first session kicked off with a presentation from Yale University’s Amanda Kowalski on the labor market impact of mandate-based health insurance, followed by a response from Cornell Professor Samuel Kleiner. Seth Seabury of the RAND Corporation then discussed his research on the unintended consequences of products liability in the pharmaceutical market, with commentary from Frakes.

Subsequent sessions featured the work of scholars from George Mason University, University of Pennsylvania Law School, University of Chicago Law School, and Columbia University, as well as analysis from faculty members of Cornell Law and Cornell University’s Department of Policy Analysis and Management.

“The conference fostered a rich inter-disciplinary discussion of a number of topics of significance to modern health care policy,” says Frakes. “Consistent with one of the conference’s key goals, the presentations also showcased the application of novel methodological approaches.”

-- Owen Lubozynski