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Scoops January 17 First Assignment Issue

Initial Class Assignments for Spring 2017

This newsletter contains initial class assignments for many Law School courses. If you do not see one of your classes listed below it is because the professor did not submit a first assignment.  Check the Blackboard course site for more information at https://blackboard.cornell.edu.

Textbooks for law courses are available at the Cornell Store on Ho Plaza across from Willard Straight Hall.  Click on the shop textbooks button. For a complete listing of store hours see https://store.cornell.edu/t-store-information.aspx.

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First Year Courses

Civil Procedure (AD)-Clermont

The assignment for the first class appears in Course Information, which you'll find at the course website on Blackboard.

Civil Procedure (CE)-Clopton

Welcome! For our first meeting, please read pages 227-40, 249-51, and 417-27 in our casebook, Field, Kaplan, Clermont & Struve, Civil Procedure: Materials for a Basic Course, Concise 11th ed. (2014). A full syllabus will be available on Blackboard prior to the first meeting. I look forward to working with you.

Civil Procedure (BF)-Holden-Smith

Welcome back. Hope everyone is rested and ready for an exciting semester of Civil Procedure! Please download a cop of the Course Outline from the Blackboard site fortis course. There you will see that the first assignment requires you to review pages 226-230 of the FKC Casebook and to read carefully, and be prepared to discuss, pages 417-427 of the Casebook.

Constitutional Law (AF)-Chafetz

Welcome back! Our first meeting will be on Tuesday, January 24, at 9:05 AM, in room 186. The syllabus will be posted in the Content section of Blackboard. Please read the syllabus and the assignment for Class 1 before class. The required book for this course is Brest, Levinson, Balkin, Amar & Siegel, Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking (6th ed. 2015), which is available at the Cornell bookstore. Please note that laptops and other electronic devices are not permitted in class; come prepared to take notes by hand.

Torts (E)-Dorfman

Syllabus, reading assignments, and materials for the course are available at the Blackboard website.

Torts (CF)-Heise

Prior to our first class-scheduled for Monday, January 23, 2017, at 8:35 AM in Room 182-please read and be prepared to discuss pp. xxxi-xxxvii; 3-4 from our primary text for the course, Richard A. Epstein & Catherine M. Sharkey, Cases and Materials on Torts (11th ed., 2016).

Please note that we'll be using a new edition (11th) of the Epstein & Sharkey casebook which departs in important ways from prior editions.

Copies of our course syllabus are available on-line via Blackboard. I will also bring a few hard copies to our first class.

Torts (D)-Schwab

Welcome back! You may purchase either the 10th or 11th edition of the casebook, Epstein and Sharkey, Cases and Materials on Torts (10th ed. 2012) (11th ed. 2016). The syllabus is available on Blackboard. The assignment for the first class is:

Assignment 1. Intent
Vosburg v. Putney, pp. 3-11 (11th ed.: pp. 3-11).
Alcorn v. Mitchell, pp. 59-60 (11th ed.: pp. 56-58).

Torts (AB)-Wendel

Please access the course syllabus on Blackboard, and read the course policies and first class assignment.

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Upperclass Courses

Bankruptcy-Lienau

Happy new year and welcome back! We will use (1) Warren, Westbrook, Porter & Pottow, The Law of Debtors and Creditors (Aspen, 7th ed.) and (2) Bankruptcy and Article 9 Statutory Supplement (Aspen), both of which are available at the Cornell Bookstore. For the first meeting, please read pp. 1-19 of the casebook (also excerpted on Blackboard) and think through problems 1.1-1.2. The preliminary syllabus will be available on Blackboard.

Business Organizations (Sections 1 and 2)-Greenwood

The casebook for the class is Palmiter & Partnoy: Corporations: A Contemporary Approach (West, 2d ed., 2014). For the first class, please read pages 25-43. Please note that later in the semester, there will be required assignments from Lynn Stout, The Shareholder Value Myth (Berrett Koehler, 2012).

Business Organizations (Section 3, LLMs)-Gramitto Ricci

Read pages 25-43 from assigned text, Palmiter & Partnoy: Corporations: A Contemporary Approach.

Client Counseling-Freed

Please note that students must attend the first class (on Monday, January 23) to remain in the course or to potentially enter the course from the wait list. Before class, please read Chapters 1-3 and Chapter 13 (pages 316-327 only) in Lawyers as Counselors: A Client-Centered Approach (3d ed. 2012).

Corporate Finance-Omarova

Please see the course syllabus on Blackboard for reading assignments and course information.

Education Law-Heise

Prior to our first class-scheduled for 8:35 AM on Tuesday, January 24, 2017, in Room 182-please read and be prepared to discuss pp.1-17 in our principal text, Yudof et al., Educational Policy and the Law (5th ed. 2012).

I will distribute copies of the course syllabus at our first class as well as through Blackboard. After that, additional copies will be available from Ms. Jackson in Room 315.

Evidence (Section 1)-Colb

Hi students. Welcome to Evidence. This post contains the assignments for your first 4 Evidence classes. The syllabus (which also includes the assignments for the first weeks of class) will be available on the e-Blackboard. I use abbreviations in my assignments, so here are the meanings of various abbreviations:

CB = Casebook: GEORGE FISHER, EVIDENCE, THIRD EDITION (Foundation Press 2013).

SUPP = GEORGE FISHER, 2016-2017 FEDERAL RULES OF EVIDENCE STATUTORY AND CASE SUPPLEMENT TO EVIDENCE, THIRD EDITION (Foundation Press 2014).

The abbreviations "t", "b", and "m", respectively, refer to the top of an assigned page, the bottom of an assigned page, and the middle of an assigned page.

You'll want to read each assignment, including both the casebook pages and supplement pages listed, prior to the class for which it is assigned. "(1)" refers to the first class meeting, "(2)" to the second, and so on. You need not read the "Problems" that appear in the book unless they are specifically assigned in the syllabus.

The first class will meet on Monday, January 23rd, in room 184 at 12:20. Our class will be meeting on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 12:20 in room 184.

I. Overview of Evidence

(1) CB 1-8t, SUPP 118-119 (Rule 606), SUPP 113 (Rule 601), SUPP 115 (Rule 602), SUPP 116 (Rule 603), and SUPP 146 (Rule 610), CB 372-373, Supp. 504m-506, column located at http://tinyurl.com/juryrooms.

II. The Relevance Relationship: From Fact to Conclusion to Issue

(2) SUPP 11 (Rule 104(a)), SUPP 37 (Rule 401), SUPP 39 (Rule 402), CB 22-34t (including Problems 1.1-1.5).

(3) SUPP 11 (Rule 104(b)) and SUPP 14-15 (portion of Advisory Committee Notes on "Subdivision (b))", SUPP 41 (Rule 403) and SUPP 42-43t (portion of Advisory Committee Notes on Rule 403), CB 36m-38m, CB 49b-58m.

(4) CB 64m-65b (including Problems 1.10-1.11), CB 82b-94b.

Evidence (Section 2)-Colb

Hi students. Welcome to Evidence. This post contains the assignments for your first 4 Evidence classes. The syllabus (which also includes the assignments for the first weeks of class) will be available on the e-Blackboard. I use abbreviations in my assignments, so here are the meanings of various abbreviations:

CB = Casebook: GEORGE FISHER, EVIDENCE, THIRD EDITION (Foundation Press 2013).

SUPP = GEORGE FISHER, 2016-2017 FEDERAL RULES OF EVIDENCE STATUTORY AND CASE SUPPLEMENT TO EVIDENCE, THIRD EDITION (Foundation Press 2014).

The abbreviations "t", "b", and "m", respectively, refer to the top of an assigned page, the bottom of an assigned page, and the middle of an assigned page.

You'll want to read each assignment, including both the casebook pages and supplement pages listed, prior to the class for which it is assigned. "(1)" refers to the first class meeting, "(2)" to the second, and so on. You need not read the "Problems" that appear in the book unless they are specifically assigned in the syllabus.

The first class will meet on Monday, January 23rd, in room 184 at 1:25. Our class will be meeting on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 1:25 in room 184.

I. Overview of Evidence

(1) CB 1-8t, SUPP 118-119 (Rule 606), SUPP 113 (Rule 601), SUPP 115 (Rule 602), SUPP 116 (Rule 603), and SUPP 146 (Rule 610), CB 372-373, Supp. 504m-506, column located at http://tinyurl.com/juryrooms.

II. The Relevance Relationship: From Fact to Conclusion to Issue

(2) SUPP 11 (Rule 104(a)), SUPP 37 (Rule 401), SUPP 39 (Rule 402), CB 22-34t (including Problems 1.1-1.5).

(3) SUPP 11 (Rule 104(b)) and SUPP 14-15 (portion of Advisory Committee Notes on "Subdivision (b))", SUPP 41 (Rule 403) and SUPP 42-43t (portion of Advisory Committee Notes on Rule 403), CB 36m-38m, CB 49b-58m.

(4) CB 64m-65b (including Problems 1.10-1.11), CB 82b-94b.

Federal Courts-Dorf

Please review the syllabus (on Blackboard) and prepare assignment 1 for the first day of class. Be prepared to discuss the following: Suppose that Congress passes and President Trump signs a new law that: (a) abolishes all of the lower federal courts; (b) abolishes four seats on the Supreme Court, those currently occupied by Justices Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan; and (c) creates new lower federal courts with new names but the same jurisdiction and rules as the old ones. President Trump then (d) nominates candidates to fill the existing vacancy on the Supreme Court and all of the new judgeships. The Senate confirms all of the nominees. Which, if any, of the foregoing measures are unconstitutional? What provision(s) of the Constitution do they violate?

Federal Income Taxation-Green

For the first class, please read pages 22-27 in Michael J. Graetz & Deborah H. Schenk, Federal Income Taxation: Principles and Policies (7th ed. 2013).

Introduction to Depositions-Whelan

Please check Blackboard for the assignment. If you are on the waitlist and cannot access Blackboard for this course, you should contact my assistant, Kara Conklin, at kc947@cornell.edu, for the assignment information.

Introduction to Depositions-Pinnisi

Prepare a written outline to hand in and to facilitate class discussion that addresses each of following points:

  1. The goals of a deposition
    a. for the lawyer taking the deposition
    b. for the lawyer defending the deposition
    c. for the witness d. for the parties
  2. The most important things to do:
    a. to prepare to take a deposition
    b. to prepare to defend a deposition
    c. to testify at a deposition
  3. The most important uses of a completed deposition
  4. This course
    a. why you signed up
    b. what you want to get out of it
    c. what you are willing to do to achieve your goals

I expect that your answers will be informed by Internet and other research.

Content should be in outline form, double spaced, and not exceed two pages in length. Your outline can be delivered in hard copy at the first class, or in advance to michael@pinnisi.com.

Law Governing Lawyers-Wendel

Please access the course syllabus on Blackboard, and read the course policies and first class assignment.

Legislation-Chafetz

Welcome back! Our first meeting will be on Tuesday, January 24, at 2:30 PM, in room G90. The syllabus will be posted in the Content section of Blackboard. Please read the syllabus and the assignment for Class 1 before class. There are two required books for this class: (1) Eskridge, Frickey, Garrett & Brudney, Cases and Materials on Legislation and Regulation: Statutes and the Creation of Public Policy (5th ed. 2014); and (2) Eskridge, Brudney & Chafetz, 2016 Supplement to Cases and Materials on Legislation and Regulation (2016). Both are available at the Cornell bookstore. Please note that laptops and other electronic devices are not permitted in class; come prepared to take notes by hand.

Oral Presentation Skills-Atlas

Thanks for enrolling in Oral-Presentation Skills. This accelerated course will meet on the following days: January 24, January 26, January 31, February 2, February 7, and February 9. Classes will be held from 6:05 p.m. to 8:05 p.m. in room 389. You must attend the first class to remain in the course or to enter the course from the wait list, and, absent exceptional circumstances, you may not miss any of the six classes. There is no assignment for the first class (you will each make a presentation at the second class), but be prepared to discuss your public-speaking experience.

Professional Responsibility for LLMs-Taylor Poppe

I'm looking forward to our first class. In preparation, please read Chapter 3(C)-(F), pages 55-82 in Ann Southworth & Catherine L. Fisk, The Legal Profession: Ethics in Contemporary Practice (West, 2014). Also please briefly review the Preamble to the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, pages 7-9, in Susan R. Martyn, Lawrence J. Fox, and W. Bradley Wendel, The Law Governing Lawyers: Model Rules, Standards, Statutes, and State Lawyer Rules of Professional Conduct (Wolters Kluwer, 2016-2017 ed.).

Securities Regulation-Junewicz, Sakowitz, and Whitehead

For the first class, please read from Coffee, Sale & Henderson, Securities Regulation, Cases and Materials (13th ed. 2015): The Goals of Securities Regulation, pp. 3-12. In addition, please skim The Regulatory Framework, pp. 56-69. You should also read (in the Statutory Supplement) Securities Act of 1933 § 5 carefully, as well as §§ 4(1), 4(3), 4(4), 12(a)(1), 13. A more complete list of the first readings is on the course website.

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Colloquia, Seminars, and Problem Courses

Advanced Criminal Procedure: Post Conviction Remedies-K. Weyble

Our first meeting will occur on Monday, January 23.  Students should read and be prepared to discuss the following materials, all of which are available on Blackboard:  Brown v. Allen, 344 U.S. 443 (1953) (op. of Frankfurter, J.) (edited);  Fay v. Noia, 372 U.S. 391 (1963) (edited);  Bator, Finality in Criminal Law and Federal Habeas Corpus for State Prisoners, 76 Harv. L. Rev. 441 (1963).

Advanced Principles of American Legal Writing-C. Weyble

Please check Blackboard for assignments.

Chinese Law: Tradition and Modernization-Yu

We will meet on Monday, January 23 for our first class. Please check the course Blackboard site for the syllabus and reading assignment.

Comparative Legal Philosophy-Yu

We will meet on Tuesday, January 24 for our first class. Please check the course Blackboard site for the syllabus and reading assignment.

Contract Law in the Twenty-First Century-Hillman

The seminar will meet on  Thursdays, beginning on  January 26 at 4:15 in room 387 of Myron Taylor Hall.  For the first meeting, please read  the syllabus and excerpts from Hillman, "The Future of Fault in Contract Law." You can pick up copies of these materials from my administrative assistant, B. J. Coughlin in Myron Taylor Hall, room 213.

Courts, Politics, and the Judicial Function-Goldbach

Welcome! For our first class I will ask you to read excerpts from Montesquieu, The Spirit of Laws (Thomas Nugent trans. 1914), and Aharon Barak, Forward: A Judge on Judging: the Role of a Supreme Court in a Democracy, 116 Harvard Law Review, 16 (2002). You can access the readings on Blackboard, or contact me or my assistant Kara Conklin, kc947@cornell.edu and we will send them to you. While you are reading these texts, consider the following questions: What is the role of a judge? Should there be the limits to the judicial function? What functions do courts play in a democratic society? When and how are judges political? Is there any acceptable level of politicization of the judiciary? What are the boundaries between law and politics? Have judges "legalized" politics? The first class will be on Thursday, January 26 at 12:20 pm in Room 387. I look forward to meeting you there.

Deals Seminar: Hedge Funds, PE Funds, and Other Investment Vehicles-Nowak

The assignment for the first two classes appears in Blackboard under Content. Please make sure you bring your laptops/tablets to class in order to access the cases, statutes, etc. online.

Deals Seminar: Law and Investment Banking-Radey

Please read the following for the first class. All reading materials can be found on Blackboard.

1. Form 20-F for Credit Suisse Group AG, 12-15, 21-25 (Credit Suisse, 2015).
2. Congressional Research Service Report, Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of U.S. Financial Supervision, 1-3, 5-14, 18-27 (2010).
3. Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Sound Practices for Managing Legal Risk: Principles for Legal Departments in Financial Institutions (2006).
4. Stephen M. Cutler, Speech by SEC Staff: Remarks Before the National Regulatory Services Investment Advisers and Broker-Dealer Compliance/Risk Management Conference (Sept. 9, 2003).

Optional:
1. Credit Suisse, Form 20-F for Credit Suisse Group AG, 16-20, 26-42 (2015).

Global Labor and Employment Law-Sander

Welcome back from the break, and welcome to Global Labor and Employment Law.  In preparation for the first class, please read (1) the Baker & McKenzie publication US Employment Law for Global Employers (available at digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu), focusing on the Introduction, section I(1,2, 5-8), section II(1-4, 8), section III (1-2), and all of sections IV and V; and (2) Critical Issues in European Employment Law for the Global In-House Counsel, pp. 1-31 (which will be available on Blackboard).  As you read the materials on US employment law, please imagine you are a foreign entrepreneur/manager/Human Resources executive and be prepared to discuss what aspects of US employment law present the biggest risks and opportunities in operating your business.

International Criminal Law-Ndulo

The first class will consider the following issues:
(a) Sources and Principles of International Law
(b) History of International Criminal Law, Tribunals
(c) Nuremberg, Tokyo, Truth Commissions and Confronting the Past

Please read pages 5-29 from course textbook, International Criminal Law and Its Enforcement: Cases and Materials, (2014, 3rd Edition) Beth Van Schaack & Ronald C. Slye.

International Litigation-Clopton

Welcome!  The casebook for this course is Gary B. Born & Peter B. Rutledge, International Civil Litigation (5th ed.). For the first week, I have posted an assignment on Blackboard under "Course Info." If you have any difficulty obtaining this assignment, please do not hesitate to contact me. Additional information about our course will be available on Blackboard and during the first course meeting.  I look forward to working with you.

Islamic Law and History-Powers

Read Malise Ruthven, Islam: A Very Short Introduction. Attendance at first class is mandatory.

Issues in Financial Regulation-Omarova

In this seminar, we will explore some of the critical challenges in the ongoing process of post-crisis regulatory reform through the lens of the evolving role and functions of collective investments funds - including mutual funds, hedge funds, private equity and venture capital funds, pension funds, and sovereign wealth funds - in the national and global financial systems. The focus of the seminar is explicitly on the systemic-risk footprint (rather than transaction-specific aspects) of the diverse and dynamic investment management industry. The goal of the seminar is to give students a deeper and more comprehensive overview of the vitally important "buy side" in today's financial markets.

For the first class session, please read the following materials, which are meant to set forth the general context for discussions of specific topics during the semester:

I. SETTING THE CONTEXT: FUNDS AND FUND MANAGERS

WILLIAM BIRDTHISTLE, EMPIRE OF THE FUND (2016), pp. 1-67- Blackboard.
JOHN KENNETH GALBRAITH, THE GREAT CRASH 1929 (1997 ed.), Ch. III (pp. 46-65) - Blackboard (NOTE: this is a very easy and fun read, with very little actual text on each page).

Questions for Discussion: Why is it important to understand the incentives, business strategies, and systemic functions of collective investment vehicles and their managers? Pose a question you would like to discuss in class.

Separation of Powers-Chafetz

Welcome back!  Our first meeting will be on Thursday, January 26, at 4:15 PM, in room 285.  The syllabus and all readings for the class will be posted in the Content section of Blackboard.  Please read the syllabus and the assignment for Class 1 before class.  Please note that laptops and other electronic devices are not permitted in class; come prepared to take notes by hand.

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From Markeisha Miner

Dean of Students

Markeisha Miner

Brunch

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From Chenay Weyble

Lecturer of Law and Director of Academic Support

Office Hours January 17-20 (Room G57):

  • Tuesday and Wednesday: drop-in 9:00-10:00 a.m., 3:00-4:00 p.m.
  • Thursday and Friday: drop-in 9:00-10:00 a.m., 1:00-2:00 p.m.
Or by appointment: (607) 255-0146 or cbw75@cornell.edu

Perspective.  I hope you had a wonderful break and got some much-needed rest. Recharging your batteries now is necessary preparation for the spring semester. While you had a break around every six weeks during the fall semester, you don't get a break until week 11 in the spring. You can avoid feeling "burned out" if you approach the 15-week spring semester with a specific plan to balance your workload with relaxation time. Please come see me if you need help with a schedule.

But you're probably too focused on your fall grades right now to plan for the spring. Keep the grades in perspective and consider how much you learned last semester, both about the law and law school. That knowledge will serve as a building block for this semester. Whether you are pleased with or disappointed in your grades, you should reflect on your performance and make a plan for improvement. I will be available during Lawyering Week to work with anyone who wants advice on how to work more efficiently and effectively this semester. Welcome back!

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Positions Available

Professor Chutkow seeks an RA for research on pro se litigant appeals in the federal courts. If interested, please send your resume to dmc66@cornell.edu.

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Graduate Legal Studies

LL.M. Course Counseling Sessions

LL.M. students may review course enrollment selections with Dean Houghton.  Please email gls@cornell.edu to schedule a meeting prior to the end of Add/Drop (noon, January 31).  Hope you all had a relaxing break!

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Writing Competitions

2017 Ruth Whitehead Whaley Scholarships

The Association of Black Women Attorneys (ABWA) is now accepting applications for the 2017 Ruth Whitehead Whaley Scholarships.  The application can be found at www.abwanewyork.org.  These scholarships are awarded to law students who demonstrate financial need, exhibit an interest in the public sector or civil rights law, and actively participate in community service. Students must be enrolled at an accredited law school in New York, New Jersey or Connecticut.  Applications must be received by March 1, 2017.  Award recipients will be notified by March 28, 2017 and will be expected to attend ABWA's 41th Anniversary Gala at the Rainbow Room on April 21, 2017.  Scholarships will be awarded in the amount of $3,000.

2017 Ed Mendrzycki Essay Contest

This year's contest hypothetical involves the ethical concerns arising under the Model Rules of Professional Conduct where a law firm seeks to affiliate itself with litigation funding companies, including undertaking representation of one such company and, in turn, recommending its services to the firm's clients.  $5000 award for best essay.  Deadline: March 3, 2017.  For full contest hypothetical and rules, see http://ambar.org/LPLEssayContest.

Access to Justice Essay Competition

The 2017 Hogan/Smoger Access to Justice Essay Competition invites submissions on the topic:  What Does the Trump Presidency Mean for Access to Justice?  Prize: $5,000. The deadline is April 28, 2017.  See www.citizen.org/law-school-contest.

International Association of Defense Counsel - Legal Writing Contest

The IADC is a professional association that has been serving invitation-only membership of international corporate and insurance civil defense lawyers since 1920. First prize: $2000. All JD candidates enrolled in 2016-17 at accredited law schools are eligible. Deadline: May 19, 2017. Copies of contest rules, writing guidelines, and entry forms can be found on the IADC website at www.iadclaw.org.

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