Alumni Short

2011 Clarke Initiative Colloquium

FALL 2011 SEMINAR:

Colloquium on Law and Development in the Middle East and North Africa (the "MENA Law and Development Colloquium")
THEME: Law, Revolution and Reform in the Arab World

The MENA Law and Development Colloquium meets the first six Thursdays of the Fall 2011 semester (August 25-September 29), from 12:20pm to 2:20pm in Room G85 at Cornell Law School. Invited participants include law students and other graduate students, faculty and other interested members of the Cornell community. The goal is to foster discussion and dialogue on larger themes and specific cases in a seminar setting that encourages sophisticated and interdisciplinary perspectives.

Schedule of Speakers and Topics
  • Thurs. Sep. 1. Resisting Democracy: America and the Egyptian Regime – Jason Brownlee
  • Thurs. Sep. 8. Law and the Mideast 2011 Revolution: On Nonviolence, Constitutional Moments, and Transitional Justice – Chibli Mallat
  • Thurs., Sep. 15. Egypt's Constitutional Revolution– Nathan Brown
  • Thurs, Sep. 22. Still Stalled Between Seasons: State-Building and Mass Mobilization in Palestine – Omar Dajani
  • Thurs., Sep. 29. Legitimacy, Authority and Sovereignty in Islamic Thought: Toward a Pluralist (Political) Ethics - Anver Emon

 

Thurs. Sep. 1. Resisting Democracy: America and the Egyptian Regime

Jason Brownlee

Is an associate professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin, where he teaches courses on US foreign policy, Egyptian politics, and democratization. Proficient in Arabic, Brownlee has been traveling to and studying Egypt for over fifteen years. His first book, <em>Authoritarianism in an Age of Democratization</em>, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2007. His articles have appeared in a range of scholarly and policy journals, including the <em>American Journal of Political Science</em>, <em>Harvard International Review</em>, and <em>Middle East Report.</em> During 2010- 2011, Brownlee was a visiting fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. He is completing a book on relations between the United States and the Egyptian security state.

 

Thurs. Sep. 8. Law and the Mideast 2011 Revolution: On Nonviolence, Constitutional Moments, and Transitional Justice

Chibli Mallat, currently teaching at Harvard Law School as the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Visiting Professor of Islamic Law and Justice, joined the faculty of the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law as Professor of Middle Eastern Law and Politics in 2007. He was named Presidential Professor in 2009, and served between 2008 and 2010 as Senior Legal Advisor to the Global Justice Project: Iraq. He also holds the EU Jean Monnet Chair of Law at Saint Joseph's University in Lebanon. He has held research and teaching positions in the US at Princeton University, Yale Law School, the University of Virginia Law School, the Library of Congress, University of California at Berkeley (Boalt Hall) School of Law, in Europe at London University's School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Lyon, and in Lebanon at Saint Joseph's University and the Islamic University. As a legal practitioner and consultant Professor Mallat has litigated several international criminal law cases, and advises governments, corporations and individuals in Middle Eastern and international law.
 

Thurs., Sep. 15. Egypt's Constitutional Revolution

Nathon Brown is Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at The George Washington University in Washington, DC.  He is a specialist on the comparative politics of the Middle East.  He also serves as a nonresident senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.  Professor Brown is the author of six books, including Participation, not Domination: Islamist Political Parties and Semiauthoritarian Politics in the Arab World (forthcoming, Cornell University Press, fall 2011),Constitutions in a Nonconstitutional World: Arab Basic Laws and the Prospects for Accountable Government, (State University of New York Press, 2001), and The Rule of Law in the Arab World: Courts in Egypt and the Gulf (Cambridge University Press, 1997). Professor Brown received his B.A. in 1980 from the University of Chicago and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1983 and 1987.  His doctoral dissertation was awarded the Malcolm Kerr Prize by the Middle East Studies Association.  He taught for one year at Ben-Gurion University in Israel as a Fulbright fellow and received previous Fulbright grants to conduct research in Egypt and the Gulf. He has also conducted research funded by the United States Institute of Peace and served as a member of the international advisory committees for drafting the Iraqi and Palestinian constitutions.  He has consulted with various United States and international agencies and briefed senior officials in the United States and Europe on several occasions.  In 2009, he was named a Carnegie Scholar by the Carnegie Corporation of New York for his work on Islamist political movements.

Thurs, Sep. 22. Still Stalled Between Seasons: State-Building and Mass Mobilization in Palestine

Omar Dajani is a Professor of Law at the McGeorge School of Law of the University of the Pacific.  Previously, Professor Dajani served as political adviser on Palestinian Affairs to the United Nations Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process (2001-2003) and as legal adviser to the Palestinian negotiating team in peace talks with Israel (1999-2001).  Professor Dajani also continues to provide occasional advice both to the Palestinian negotiating team and to institution-building and peace-building projects in the Middle East and elsewhere. His publications includeShadow or Shade: The Roles of Law in Palestinian-Israeli Peace Talks, 32 Yale J. Int'l L. 61 (2007).
 

Thurs., Sep. 29. Legitimacy, Authority and Sovereignty in Islamic Thought: Toward a Pluralist (Political) Ethics

Anver Emon joined the Faculty of Law in 2005 and is Associate Professor of Law. Professor Emon's research focuses on premodern and modern Islamic legal history and theory; premodern modes of governance and adjudication; and the role of Shari'a both inside and outside the Muslim world.  He teaches Tort Lae. Statutory Interpretation, and specialized seminars on Islamic legal history, gender and Islamic law, and law and religion.  The author ofIslamic Natural Law Theories (Oxford University Press, 2010), Professor Emon is the co-editor of Islamic Law and International Human Rights: Searching for Common Ground? (Oxford, Forthcoming), the Editor in Chief, ofMiddle East Law and Governance: An Interdisciplinary Journal, and sits on the editorial board of The Journal of Law and Religion.